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The Ultimate Hardgainer Workout Guide

Published: 13th May 2018. Last updated: 21th July 2019.

Matthew Smith

Staff Writer


Introduction

So much of the fitness and nutrition world seems to be focussed on weight loss that an entire demographic of people has been mostly neglected. This demographic is younger males who find it very hard to gain weight. The idea may seem preposterous to many people, that there are people who actually want to increase their weight, but actually being a hard gainer can be just as challenging as being overweight.

While anyone can increase their body weight (just stop walking and start ordering take out three times per day), building muscle mass is another matter entirely. Hard gainers find this very difficult, and it is the purpose of this article to identify why this is, and hopefully to solve the issue for you. We will look at why you are a hard gainer, whether it is a dietary or a training issue, and we will help you to create your own training program that will yield serious results.

What Is A "Hardgainer"?

First of all, we want to be clear, YES hard gainers are real, it’s not just you. There are many factors that can affect muscle growth, these can be genetic, sociological, or even psychological. One of the most common causes is a lack of patience, but more on that later. To be a hard gainer you need to have been training regularly for at least six months and you need to have struggled to put on any muscle mass or seen any major strides in strength gains.

It is really difficult to diagnose (not that this is necessarily a scientific/medical issue) hard gainers, because a lot of it comes down to perception. Let’s use an example:

  • Person A: Starts off at 60kg at 5 foot 10 with 10% body fat. They train for 6 months and see a marked increase in their bench press, squat, and deadlift. They gain 2kg of muscle in that time. They are very happy with these results and remain motivated to keep training.
  • Person B: Starts off at 60kg at 5 foot 10 with 10% body fat. They train for 6 months and see a marked increase in their bench press, squat, and deadlift. They gain 2kg of muscle in that time. They are very disappointed with these results and as a result decide that their training is not working.

Objectively, 2kg of muscle within six months is a good return. Yes, some people would see better results in that same time (particularly if they are new to lifting) but others would not even manage that. If we had fast forwarded to six months further perhaps Person A would have seen further increases in muscle mass.

As you can see, hard gainers can sometimes not be hard gainers at all. But that does not mean that hard gainers do not exist. Just that they are rarer than most people assume.

A common cause of hard gainers is body type. You may have heard of ectomorphs, endomorphs, and mesomorphs. Three categorizations of body types. Mesomorphs are the athletic V-shaped torso who gain muscle easily and can maintain lower body fat percentages. Endomorphs are smaller and rounder, they can build muscle very easily but also accumulate fat very quickly. Ectomorphs are the stereotypical tall and thin guys who never seem to have any body fat but also really struggle to build muscle.

Right now, you’ve probably noticed two things. 1) This is mostly centred around men, and 2) There are many people who do not fit into these categories.

Both of these are true. Sadly, it is difficult to create an article such as this one that applies to both males and females. Yes, female hard gainers exist but the requirements are different, and the methods also differ. Addressing the second point, body type categorization is a very clunky system, and truth be told it probably causes more issues than it solves.

People are not very good at categorizing or accurately assessing themselves, and what happens if you are a tall and fat guy? Or if you have all the attributes of a mesomorph but injured your knee and gained 50lbs through comfort eating? Suddenly you don’t really fit any of the categories.

But most hard gainers will fit into the ectomorph category. Sure, there are small hard gainers, but often hard gainers are quite tall. This is because longer limbs can make building muscle more difficult. If you look at bodybuilding competitions, you’d be amazed at how short most bodybuilders are. Same thing goes with powerlifters and World’s Strongest Man competitors.

They may not be ridiculously short, but none of them would be described as lanky (except perhaps a few outliers). The average height of a bodybuilder is around 5 foot 7, while the ideal height for a bodybuilder is about 5 foot 10. There have been some very tall bodybuilders in the past, but the vast majority would need a ladder to reach the top shelf.

Bodybuilding is an extreme example, and you could easily point to all the super tall rugby, football, soccer, and basketball players who still have great physiques. But please remember two things 1) These are almost always mesomorphs rather than ectomorphs, and 2) these are people who’s job it is to gain muscle. We’re not saying that you can’t be very tall and musclebound, we’re just saying that it is difficult.

Anyway, now that we have established what a hard gainer is let’s take a look at some of the difficulties faced by hard gainers.

Difficulties Faced By Hardgainers

Lifting weights is all about moving a heavy object through a full range of motion, the longer your arms or legs are, the further that weight has to travel. What does that mean? It is more difficult for a tall person to squat, deadlift, bicep curl, or press, than it is for a short or average height person. If you are a small hard gainer then you may be wondering how this applies to you? It doesn’t, you are a hard gainer for other reasons, shorter limbs are actually beneficial for you. Don’t get too smug though!

Larger ranges of motion will reduce the amount of weight you can lift and will affect your muscle gains. However, that is not all. Longer bones mean that the muscles need to be longer and thinner. So, you can build a huge set of biceps, but they won’t look anywhere near as big as they would do on a shorter man.

Many hard gainers tend to have a very fast metabolism, this is usually due to something as innocuous as fidgeting more during the day. As crazy as it sounds, people who fidget are going to burn 100+ calories per day more than people who tend to sit still for large periods of time. But it’s not just fidgeting, hard gainers are generally more active during the day, meaning that they burn more calories, meaning that they find it difficult to create an environment where they can build muscles.

If you are that guy who can eat whatever he wants while still rocking a six-pack, don’t feel guilty, you’re working that junk food off every day without realising it. Just by being borderline ADHD without knowing it!

Another difficulty is a lack of motivation, if you are going to the gym week in, week out and not seeing any changes then it can be hard to motivate yourself to continue. People who find building muscle relatively easy, or people who are looking to lose weight will see results much quicker and will get their continuing motivation from that. Hard gainers need to accept that results will come, they just take longer.

Is It A Diet Or Training Issue?

The title of this article is “The Ultimate Hard Gainer Workout Guide” which would suggest that building muscle when you are a hard gainer is more of a physiological issue. That isn’t really the case. Some would say that dieting is actually more important. But we don’t like to put it that way, the truth is that building muscle is the result of both dietary and training adherence. Get either wrong and your results will be compromised. Get both right and you cannot fail!

How To Implement A "Hardgainer Diet Plan"

While the main focus of this article is on the training it would be absolutely insane to leave out diet as this is such a big factor in building muscle. We’ll try and keep things simple, as nutrition is such a broad topic. If you want to build muscle, then you will need to be in a calorie surplus. What is a calorie surplus? It is where your daily calorie intake exceeds the number of calories you burn. Actually, it is a common misconception that your daily calorie intake is so important. Think bigger. Your weekly calorie intake, your monthly calorie intake etc …

If you are looking to build muscle within 12 weeks, then you would need to create a calorie surplus over those 12 weeks. Your muscles need the increased calories to increase in size. Technically it is possible to build muscle while in a calorie deficit, but those unique circumstances are not going to apply here.

To establish whether you are in a calorie surplus or deficit you are going to need to start tracking your calories in (using a calorie tracker such as MyFitnessPal) and tracking the number of calories you burn each day. This can be easily done online with the help of a step counting app (a Fitbit would be perfect for this job but you can use free step counters on your phone too).

You will also want some measurements so that you have a good idea of where you are now and where how far you have come over the 12 weeks. Sometimes being a hard gainer is all in the mind, while you’re actually making progress.

You now have a decision to make, do you want to build muscle slowly with minimal body fat accumulation or would you rather build muscle as fast as possible and deal with the increased body fat at a later time. If the former, then you will only want to create a small surplus, 100-200 calories per day. You will still gain a bit of body fat but it will not be noticeable and you’ll see excellent yet slow gains.

Alternatively, you can create a large deficit (400-600 calories per day) and build muscle quite fast, though you will also gain quite a lot of excess body fat. As a hard gainer you’ll find it quite easy to lose the body fat again afterwards, but this may still seem like an unattractive option for many.

When it comes to what you eat, you actually have a lot more choice than you would think. Obviously, protein is essential, and you’ll want to increase the amount that you are currently consuming. However, carbs and fat are also essential. You’re not going to be in the perfect position to build muscle if you are on a low-carb or low-fat diet.

To find the ideal protein intake for you, it is necessary to estimate your lean mass weight (in kg). This can be done by estimating your body fat percentage and weighing yourself. If you are 60kg and 20% body fat then your lean mass weight would be 48kg. Then you are going to want to multiply your lean mass weight by three, this will give you a protein target in grams, in this case 144g per day.

You then want about 25% of your calories to come from fat while the rest come from carbohydrates. Please don’t get too hung up on these numbers though, they are just a rough guide. Once you have your calorie target (you can use MyFitnessPal to find your maintenance calorie intake and then manually add calories to create your surplus) and you have your macro targets you can begin to build some muscle mass.

The 4 Main Reasons You Find It Hard/Impossible To Gain Weight Or Muscle

Before we jump into the training, we thought it would be constructive to look at a number of common mistakes and issues that affect the majority of hard gainers. Why is it that many people fail to build enough muscle in a reasonable timeframe? Let’s explore.

Reason #1 – A Lack of Patience

Sadly, this is without a doubt the most common reason why people are not satisfied with their results, they expect too much, too quickly. At their peak, a bodybuilder can expect to gain about 1lb of muscle in a year naturally. So why are you getting bent out of shape because you’ve ONLY gained 2lbs of muscle in three months?

Reason #2 – A Lack of Consistency

It is no use training five times in your first week, twice in your second week, and then avoiding the gym entirely for the following two weeks. Before shamefacedly turning up the following month to start again. If this sounds familiar (it certainly does to us!) then you may not be a hard gainer, you may just need to be more consistent in your approach.

This doesn’t just apply to turning up to the gym either, you need to consistent with your calories, consistent with your supplements, and consistent with all the small details that make up your program.

Reason #3 – Not Eating Enough

If you have been the same weight for a few years, then you are not consistently eating enough! This can be sorted out by tracking your calories, but again, without consistently creating a surplus you cannot expect your muscles to grow.

Reason #4– Not Training Properly

Most gym goers refuse to entertain the idea that they may need help from a personal trainer or strength coach. But go into any gym and you can honestly expect to see at least 80% of gym goers performing exercises incorrectly, using too much weight (or too little) and not progressing properly. Bad range of motion can kill your gains, incorrect technique can lead to injury, lifting too much weight can compound both issues.

Concentrating on the wrong muscle groups can also prevent growth.

Reason #4 – Lack of Evaluation

If you aren’t regularly weighing yourself, taking progress photos, and measuring the circumference of your muscles, then how can you be sure whether you are making progress or not? Humans are notoriously bad at assessing themselves and you may be building muscle at a faster rate than you think. Or perhaps evaluating your diet could help you address your lack of progress? You’ll never know unless you start consistently (there’s that word again) evaluating your progress.

The 5 Best Exercises for Hardgainers

Don’t worry, we do intend to give you a program to follow at the end of this article. But we thought it would be beneficial to identify five of the best exercises for hard gainers, so that when you eventually have to create your own training plans you will understand how to do so.

The following five exercises should be the building blocks of any training program that you complete. Of course, there are multiple variations of each exercise that you can use – so no two programs have to be the same. The idea is that you use these five exercises as a foundation and then add in exercises around them to fill out the program.

Exercise #1 – The Deadlift

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The barbell deadlift is one of the most effective exercises out there, it works a lot of muscles, leads to a huge increase in testosterone, and it is also great at protecting your body from injury (provided you perform it correctly). This is because it teaches you how to lift heavy objects up with a flat back. This has numerous real-world benefits, but you’ll want to do it for the massive muscle gains.

To start deadlifting properly you’ll need an Olympic barbell and some plates. If you’re not strong enough to use plates yet, then learn how to perform the kettlebell deadlift first, which allows you to use much lighter weights.

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Place the barbell on a flat surface and attach some plates. Make sure that you have enough space to perform this exercise properly. If your gym is tiny and very busy, then deadlifting may not be the most considerate exercise that you can perform!

Once your barbell is set up approach the bar and stand so that the centre of your feet is directly underneath the bar. Your feet should be around shoulder width apart and your toes should be turned out slightly. Push your knees forward until your shins brush up against the barbell and then place your hands on the bar, just outside your knees.

At this point your body will be hunched over the bar, which is not a safe position to be lifting anything up. Holding on to the bar you should push your chest out which will flatten your back, once your back is flat you need to take a deep breath and brace your abdominals.

Now raise the bar up off the ground by standing upright and slowly pushing your hips forward until they are flush with the bar. Breathe out as you do this. Pause at the top of the movement, and then lower the bar back to the ground by pushing your hips backwards and maintaining a flat back.

Touch the barbell onto the floor, pause, and then repeat the movement for a second rep. Do not bounce the

Exercise #2 – The Barbell Squat

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Like the deadlift, the barbell back squat is a fantastic way to increase testosterone as well as build more muscle. Many hard gainers get too focused on building the upper body, but it is these lower body exercises that contribute the most to muscle gains.

Set up a barbell in a squat rack, the bar should be around shoulder height. Walk up to the bar and climb underneath it. Rest your upper back against the bar and using an overhand grip, grab hold of the bar tightly. Push your chest out and make sure that your back is straight.

Lift the bar off the squat rack and walk backwards so that you have some space. Place your feet shoulder width apart and turn your toes outwards. What you want to do now is to squat down as if you were about to sit on a small (invisible) chair that is a little too far behind you. This mental image will help you push your hips back and squat properly.

Pause once your thighs are around parallel to the ground. Depending on your mobility you may be able to go lower, or you may have to stop a little before parallel. If you can’t reach parallel, then please ensure that you’re not using too much weight. If you are using an easy weight and still can’t reach parallel, then don’t panic! You just have a smaller range of motion that most. The more you squat, the better this will get. Lower the weight and concentrate on form.

Pause once you’ve reached your sticking point, and then you want to drive back up to the starting position. Use a lot of power to get yourself back up, this is the most difficult part of the squat. Once you are back to your starting position you can reset and then repeat.

Exercise #3 – The Bench Press

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The bench press is without a doubt the most popular exercise amongst men in the gym. It’s not even a close competition! But for hard gainers it can be a bit of a nightmare. The pressure to “go big” can lead to guys lifting weights that are way too heavy for them, which ruins their form. Sadly, you’ve got to remove your ego and use a lighter weight. Trust us, it will be worth it in the long run.

We’ll go through how to perform a barbell bench press first, and then we will take a look at the dumbbell bench press. This is because they are both fantastic variations of the bench press, and both have slightly different requirements.

For a barbell bench press, you are going to need a bench press bench and possibly a spotter. Lie on the bench with your feet on the ground underneath you, your shoulders pulled back and touching the bench (this will push your chest up), and your hands grasping the barbell at a shoulder-width distance.

Take a deep breath and then un-rack the barbell and position it so that the bar is directly over your chest. Hold it in position and take a deep breath, then slowly lower the bar down to your chest, pause when it is just about touching (but don’t bounce the bar off your chest) and then breathe out and drive that barbell back up to the starting position. Nice and simple!

Dumbbell bench presses are slightly different. Grab a set of dumbbells and sit down on the edge of a bench. Rest each dumbbell on your knees. Now lie back on the bench and use this movement to bring the dumbbells with you, they should now be at shoulder height as you lie flat on the bench.

Bring your elbows out at a 45-degree angle from your sides and then push the dumbbells up. Instead of bringing them straight up in the air, you want to move them in an arc so that your hands finish close together and both dumbbells are over the centre of your chest.

Pause, and then lower the dumbbells back down to your chest level. Again, do this in an arc so that the dumbbells finish apart from each other and in line with your shoulders.

Exercise #4 – The Overhead Press

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The overhead press is a seriously good upper body exercise that is going to work your shoulders, triceps, and also (surprisingly) your abdominal muscles. Like the bench press, you can perform either a dumbbell or a barbell version and they’re both great. Unlike the bench press, there isn’t enough difference between the two movements to justify us describing both, so we’re just going to write about the barbell overhead press.

Set up a squat rack in the same way that you would for a squat, with the barbell at around shoulder height. Walk up to the bar and rest it on the front of your shoulders and collar bone. Use a shoulder-width, overhand grip with elbows pushed forward underneath the bar.

Un-rack the barbell and walk backwards so that you have a bit of space. Bend your knees very slightly but otherwise keep them still. Take a deep breath and then push the barbell upwards, once it has cleared your head you want to bring it backwards slightly too, in an arc. When your arms are almost fully locked out the barbell should be directly over the centre of your head.

Pause, and then lower the barbell back down, making sure to create a small arc on the way down too so that you don’t smash the bar into your nose!

Exercise #5 – The Barbell Bent Over Row

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The last of the big five exercises is the barbell bent over row, a fantastic upper back and bicep exercise that also works your rear-delt muscles. This exercise is one of the most commonly abused exercises, with people demonstrating horrible form while lifting a weight that is way too much for them. Please ensure that you are performing a bent over row rather than an almost upright row!

Grab a barbell in an overhand grip and deadlift it up so that you are standing upright with barbell in hand. Your feet should be shoulder width apart. Now, you want to bend your knees slightly and keeping your upper back straight you need to bow forward so that your chest is pointing towards the ground. A 45-degree angle from your hips to your head would be ideal. This is the dictionary definition of being bent over.

The barbell should be directly underneath your upper abs. Keeping your entire body still (if you are rocking backwards and forwards then the weight is too heavy) you want to row the barbell up until it hits your upper abdominals. Pause, and then slowly lower the barbell back down to the starting position.

The Ultimate Hardgainer Workout Routine

Now that you know how to perform the five main compound lifts (deadlift, squat, bench press, overhead press, and bent over row) you are ready to follow a proper training program. The program will be twelve weeks long, and will aim to help you build some serious mass.

There will also be a four week warm-up for those of you who 1) haven’t trained before, or 2) haven’t trained in a long time. This is so that you can get those awful DOMS-filled post-workout days out of your system before the proper program begins!

4 Week Warm Up Program

This pre-program will last four weeks and will require you to train three times per week. This may not seem like much, but when starting a program you want maximum recovery time. Also, only having to train three times per week will make it easier for you to stick to the program and will keep your motivation high!

Week one

Session One

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 12-15
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 20

Session Two

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 12-15
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 20

Session Three

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 12-15
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 20

Week Two

Session One

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 8-12
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-12
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-12
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 8-12
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 8-12
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 12

Session Two

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 8-12
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-12
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-12
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 8-12
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 8-12
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 12

Session Three

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 8-12
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-12
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-12
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 8-12
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 8-12
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 12

Week Three

Session One

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 6-8
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 8

Session Two

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 6-8
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 8

Session Three

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 6-8
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 8

Week Four

Session One

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 4-6
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 4-6
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 4-6
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 8

Session Two

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 4-6
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 4-6
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 4-6
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 8

Session Three

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 4-6
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 4-6
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 4-6
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 8

Session Four

  • Dumbbell Bench Press 3 x 4-6
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Overhead Press 3 x 4-6
  • Dumbbell Goblet Squats 3 x 4-6
  • Seated Leg Curls 3 x 4-6
  • Walking Lunges 3 x 8

12 Week Training Program

This 12-week training program will follow a similar route to the warm up program, starting with high rep sets and then slowly lowering the reps and increasing the weight (though this will be over 12 weeks rather than four). You will do four sessions per week, two “push” sessions (exercises that require pushing) and two “pull” sessions (you can probably see where this is going …).

Week One

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Week Two

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Week Three

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Week Four

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Press 3 x 12-15
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 12-15

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 10
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 12-15
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 12-15
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 12-15
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 12-15

Week Five

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Week Six

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Week Seven

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Week Eight

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Press 3 x 8-10
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 8-10

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 8
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 8-10
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 8-10
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 8-10
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 8-10

Week Nine

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8

Week Ten

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8

Week Eleven

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8

Week Twelve

Session One

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Two

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8

Session Three

  • Barbell Bench Press 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Overhead Press 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Skull Crushers 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Press 3 x 6-8
  • Leg Extensions 3 x 6-8

Session Four

  • Deadlifts 3 x 6
  • Lying Leg Curls 3 x 6-8
  • Barbell Bent Over Row 3 x 6-8
  • Lat Pulldown 3 x 6-8
  • Dumbbell Alternating Bicep Curls 3 x 6-8
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